“Consumer and Shareholder Protection” Please respond to the following: According to the text, recent disclosures of corporate scandals and unethical business practices have heightened the government and society’s attention to exorbitant CEO salaries. Examine the fundamental rationale behind corporations’ decisions to pay executives such high salaries. Judge whether the mandate under Section 951 of the Dodd-Frank Act sufficiently protects stockholders’ rights and interests from been abused by business executives. Justify your response.

"Consumer and Shareholder Protection" Please respond to the following:


According to the text, recent disclosures of corporate scandals and unethical business practices have heightened the government and society’s attention to exorbitant CEO salaries. Examine the fundamental rationale behind corporations’ decisions to pay executives such high salaries. Judge whether the mandate under Section 951 of the Dodd-Frank Act sufficiently protects stockholders’ rights and interests from been abused by business executives. Justify your response.

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Prepare a memo for the CEO in which you summarize your findings by doing the following: A. Explain how constructive discharge as a legal concept is relevant to the scenario. B. Discuss areas covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that are relevant to the scenario. C. Recommend how the company should respond to the employee’s charge of constructive discharge. 1. Include three legal references supporting your recommendation. 2. Recommend steps to avoid legal issues around Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Prepare a memo for the CEO in which you summarize your findings by doing the following:


A. Explain how constructive discharge as a legal concept is relevant to the scenario.



B. Discuss areas covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that are relevant to the scenario.



C. Recommend how the company should respond to the employee’s charge of constructive discharge.

1. Include three legal references supporting your recommendation.

2. Recommend steps to avoid legal issues around Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

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Copy and paste your question here…Remember Pets.com? Perhaps you don’t, but you might remember its most visible spokesthing, the sock puppet masquerading as a dog. Pets.com invested much of its financial resource base in promoting the company on television, via the puppet, in order to build brand recognition and attract customers to its pet product website. Pets.com folded in November 2000, as the result of too little operating capital. Your task? Using the Internet as an information resource, analyze the demise of Pets.com. You can view the site at various points in its short history through www.archive.org. a) Describe the company’s apparent business model (for each of the main model elements). How does the site differentiate itself from its competition, both online and offline? b) Who appears to have been the intended market segment? Provide a profile that contains demographic, psychographic and behavioral descriptors. Justify your profile with logic or references. Was this a wise choice of segments or not? c) Discuss ways in which the Pets.com site, at various points in its existence, illustrates use of the Internet as a content resource, a channel resource, and a communications resource.

Copy and paste your question here…Remember Pets.com? Perhaps you don’t, but you might remember its most visible spokesthing, the sock puppet masquerading as a dog. Pets.com invested much of its financial resource base in promoting the company on television, via the puppet, in order to build brand recognition and attract customers to its pet product website.

Pets.com folded in November 2000, as the result of too little operating capital. Your task? Using the Internet as an information resource, analyze the demise of Pets.com. You can view the site at various points in its short history through www.archive.org.

a) Describe the company’s apparent business model (for each of the main model elements). How does the site differentiate itself from its competition, both online and offline?

b) Who appears to have been the intended market segment? Provide a profile that contains demographic, psychographic and behavioral descriptors. Justify your profile with logic or references. Was this a wise choice of segments or not?

c) Discuss ways in which the Pets.com site, at various points in its existence, illustrates use of the Internet as a content resource, a channel resource, and a communications resource.

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LP1.2 Assignment: Ford Case Study This assignment will assess the competency 1. APPLY financial management as an analytical process that can be used to improve performance. Directions:WRITE a 750 to 1000 word paper titled Investment on the following: Download the annual income statements, balance sheets, and cash flow statements for the last three fiscal years for Ford Motor Company. Compute three different valuation ratios, three different profitability ratios, and three financial strength ratios for each of the three years. Compare the ratios over time. What do they say about the profitability and strength of Ford Motor Company? Is Ford Motor Company a ‘good investment’? Defend your answer.

LP1.2 Assignment: Ford Case Study

This assignment will assess the competency 1. APPLY financial management as an analytical process that can be used to improve performance.

Directions:WRITE a 750 to 1000 word paper titled Investment on the following: Download the annual income statements, balance sheets, and cash flow statements for the last three fiscal years for Ford Motor Company. Compute three different valuation ratios, three different profitability ratios, and three financial strength ratios for each of the three years. Compare the ratios over time. What do they say about the profitability and strength of Ford Motor Company? Is Ford Motor Company a ‘good investment’? Defend your answer.

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Joan’s utility depends on two commodities: her view of the sea and wine. Her utility function is : U = 24x – 6×2+ 4y where x = hours of view “consumed” per day y = wine. The view is free, i.e. Px = 0. The price of wine Py = 5. Her available income is 10. Assume that Joan does not look at the view beyond the point where it bores her, i.e. when the marginal utility of the view is negative. Oct 06 2017 07:58 AM

Joan’s utility depends on two commodities: her view of the sea and wine. Her utility function is :

U = 24x – 6x2+ 4y

where x = hours of view “consumed” per day

y = wine.

The view is free, i.e. Px = 0. The price of wine Py = 5. Her available income is 10. Assume that Joan does not look at the view beyond the point where it bores her, i.e. when the marginal utility of the view is negative.

Oct 06 2017 07:58 AM

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Assessment 3: Individual Reflective Journal – Individual Assignment (1000-1500 words)For this assessment, students are expected to write a weekly journal over the duration of the 12-weekteaching period that documents a critical analysis of their learning process. In the journal students need toreflect/review how they have progressed with the learning goals related to assessments 1 and 2.Students need to write their individual reflective journal concurrently to performing assessment tasks 1 and 2,i.e. from the first week of the subject. For each week, students need to make journal entries that provide areflection of their ‘journey’ of gaining, and applying knowledge of the research paradigm. For each weekstudents should reflect and compare the theoretical knowledge with what they apply into practice. Asassessment 1 and 2 are completed, students should clearly identify learning goals achieved. HI6008- Business Research T2 20176Assessment 3: Marking Criteria:Marking Criteria’s MarksIntroduction and Reflective Journal Scope 5Critically and depth of learning reflections reflective analysis 10Conclusion 5TOTAL MARKS 20SUBJECT MATERIALS AND RESOURCESPrescribed Textbook:Bryman, A. and Bell, E. (2015), Business Research Methods, (Fourth Edition), UK, Oxford Universi

Assessment 3: Individual Reflective Journal – Individual Assignment (1000-1500 words)For this assessment, students are expected to write a weekly journal over the duration of the 12-weekteaching period that documents a critical analysis of their learning process. In the journal students need toreflect/review how they have progressed with the learning goals related to assessments 1 and 2.Students need to write their individual reflective journal concurrently to performing assessment tasks 1 and 2,i.e. from the first week of the subject. For each week, students need to make journal entries that provide areflection of their ‘journey’ of gaining, and applying knowledge of the research paradigm. For each weekstudents should reflect and compare the theoretical knowledge with what they apply into practice. Asassessment 1 and 2 are completed, students should clearly identify learning goals achieved. HI6008- Business Research T2 20176Assessment 3: Marking Criteria:Marking Criteria’s MarksIntroduction and Reflective Journal Scope 5Critically and depth of learning reflections reflective analysis 10Conclusion 5TOTAL MARKS 20SUBJECT MATERIALS AND RESOURCESPrescribed Textbook:Bryman, A. and Bell, E. (2015), Business Research Methods, (Fourth Edition), UK, Oxford Universi

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Network Addressing and Security In this section, address each of the following. IP Addressing: A. Watch How to Subnet a Network Video provided in Content -> Project Instructions o Review the Network Address Template provided in Content -> Project Instructions -> Project Templates for Parts 1 – 3 o Complete the subnet chart provided at the end of the document. Security B. Select each of the firewall types to implement, describe network or host-based placement, and configuration details; and justify each of the decisions. o Students should be specific when discussing the models, types, and costs. C. Select an IDS, IPS, or both for the network and justify your decision. o Students should be specific when discussing the models, types, and costs. D. Define a DMZ implementation and justify the decision. E. Select physical security measures for each of the new academic buildings and justify the decision. o Students should be specific when discussing the models, types, and costs. F. Select additional network security measures to be implemented and justify the decision. They should include: o How you will protect against social engineering attacks, and justify your decision. o How you will protect against faculty or students willingly, or unwillingly introducing malware onto the network, and justify your decision. o What secure protocols you will require for faculty and students to use while accessing resources internal, or external to the network, and justify your decision. G. Make explicit that ……. will not be liable for any problems arising from personal use of devices in the two buildings.

Network Addressing and Security In this section, address each of the following. IP Addressing:

A. Watch How to Subnet a Network Video provided in Content -> Project Instructions

o Review the Network Address Template provided in Content -> Project Instructions -> Project Templates for Parts 1 – 3

o Complete the subnet chart provided at the end of the document. Security

B. Select each of the firewall types to implement, describe network or host-based placement, and configuration details; and justify each of the decisions.

o Students should be specific when discussing the models, types, and costs.

C. Select an IDS, IPS, or both for the network and justify your decision.

o Students should be specific when discussing the models, types, and costs.

D. Define a DMZ implementation and justify the decision.

E. Select physical security measures for each of the new academic buildings and justify the decision.

o Students should be specific when discussing the models, types, and costs.

F. Select additional network security measures to be implemented and justify the decision. They should include:

o How you will protect against social engineering attacks, and justify your decision.

o How you will protect against faculty or students willingly, or unwillingly introducing malware onto the network, and justify your decision.

o What secure protocols you will require for faculty and students to use while accessing resources internal, or external to the network, and justify your decision.

G. Make explicit that ……. will not be liable for any problems arising from personal use of devices in the two buildings.

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CLASS: PRFS 4033 – Consensus Building and Continuous Improvement CHAPTER 6; Page 178 BOOK: Supervision and Leadership in a Changing World (Gary Dessler) 1st Edition / ISBN-13: 978-0-13-505865-7 ISBN-10: 0-13-505865-1 Read Case Study “Organizing Greenley Communications” on pages 178-179 in text and answer all questions. Do not quote straight from the book. It must be your own thoughts with a minimum of 250 words in total. ASSIGNMENT IS DUE: Thurs, September 28, 2017 @ 8pm CDT (USA). 1. Draw Greenley’s current organization chart as best you can. 2. What factors should influence Greenley’s decision to restructure? 3. What risks does the proposed restructuring create? 4. What are the pros and cons of the vice president’s new proposed structure? 5. If you were Greenley, how exactly would you reorganize (if at all), and why?

CLASS: PRFS 4033 – Consensus Building and Continuous Improvement CHAPTER 6; Page 178 BOOK: Supervision and Leadership in a Changing World (Gary Dessler) 1st Edition / ISBN-13: 978-0-13-505865-7 ISBN-10: 0-13-505865-1

Read Case Study “Organizing Greenley Communications” on pages 178-179 in text and answer all questions. Do not quote straight from the book. It must be your own thoughts with a minimum of 250 words in total.

ASSIGNMENT IS DUE: Thurs, September 28, 2017 @ 8pm CDT (USA).

1. Draw Greenley’s current organization chart as best you can. 2. What factors should influence Greenley’s decision to restructure? 3. What risks does the proposed restructuring create? 4. What are the pros and cons of the vice president’s new proposed structure? 5. If you were Greenley, how exactly would you reorganize (if at all), and why?

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Evolution There are three parts to this lab. In part one, you will explore a fossil site, sketch a fossil, and write a short paragraph about the fossil and one of the fossil sites you visited. In part two, you will create a phylogenic tree, print and cut out all the caminalcules (you don’t have to be precise, and should leave the numbers attached), and glue the caminalcules to the tree following the instructions provided. In part three, use the tree to answer the six problems at the end of this document. Part 1: Fossil Record 1. Write a short paragraph about one of the sites you “visited”. I visited National Geographic and looked through lots of pictures and facts about fossils. There are so many different types of fossils, coming in all different shapes and sizes. There would be a picture of a fossil with a paragraph next to it sharing information about the fossil. The website was very informative and helpful. 2. Make a sketch of your favorite fossil. 3. Write a one-paragraph description to accompany your sketch. I sketched an example of a Stromatolite fossil. These types of fossils are the oldest fossils found at the Grand Canyon. I found this fossil to be very pretty and unique, and that’s why I chose it to be the fossil I sketched. Part 2: Caminalcules as a Model of the Fossil Record First, read about the Caminalcules, which were imaginary animals invented by the late University of Kansas evolutionary biologist Joseph Camin. Then create the phylogenic tree for Caminalcules. Caminalcules as a Model of the Fossil Record Caminalcules were imaginary animals invented by the late University of Kansas evolutionary biologist, Joseph Camin. They make ideal model organisms for introducing students to evolution. In this lab, you will construct an evolutionary history of the caminalcules using fossil species. In the process of doing this exercise, you are introduced to concepts, such as convergent evolution and vestigial structures. As a consequence of Darwin’s work, taxonomic classifications must be actual reflections of the evolutionary history of the group being studied. For example, Linnaeus put humans and wolves in the class Mammalia, within the phylum Chordata, because they share certain characteristics (e.g., backbone, hair, etc.). We now interpret this similarity as reflecting the shared evolutionary history of both species through their descent from a common ancestor. Generally speaking, the more resemblance between two species, the more recently they diverged from their common ancestor. Thus, when we say that the human and wolf are more closely related to each other than either is to the honeybee, we mean that they share a common ancestor that is not shared with the honeybee. Another way of showing the evolutionary relationship between organisms is in the form of a phylogenetic tree (Gk. phylon, stock, tribe + genus, birth, origin): The vertical axis in this figure is the timeline, typically shown over millions of years. The separation of two lines indicates when that lineage split from each other, despite their common ancestor. For example, the diagram shows us that mammals diverged from reptiles about 150 million years ago. The most recent common ancestor shared by mammals and reptiles is indicated by point A in the diagram. The horizontal axis represents, in a general way, the amount of divergence that has occurred between different groups; the greater the distance, the more divergence has happened and the further back in time is the common ancestor. Since they share a fairly recent ancestor, species within the same group (such as the class Mammalia) tend to be closer to each other at the top of the tree than they are to members of other groups. Several types of evidence can elucidate the evolutionary relationship between organisms. One approach is to compare living species. The greater the differences between them, the longer ago they presumably diverged. There are, however, pitfalls with this approach. Occasionally, species resemble each other because they independently evolved similar structures in response to similar environments or ways of life, not because of a recent common ancestor. This is called convergent evolution; distantly related species seem to have converged on a common set of adaptations. Examples of convergent evolution include the wings of bats, birds, and insects, or the streamlined shape of dolphins and fish. At first glance, it might appear that dolphins are fish. However, further examination shows this resemblance is superficial, resulting from the fact that dolphins and fish have adapted to the same environment. The presence of hair, the ability to lactate and homeothermy clearly demonstrate that dolphins are mammals. Fish lack these features. The fossil record can also be helpful for constructing phylogenetic trees. For example, bears were once thought to be within the order Carnivora. Recently discovered fossils, however, show that they actually diverged from the Canidae (wolves, etc.) fairly recently. The use of fossils is not without its problems, however. The most notable, and perhaps greatest problem, is the incomplete nature of the fossil record. This is more of a problem for some organisms than others. For example, organisms with shells or bony skeletons are more likely to be preserved than those without hard body parts. Construct a Phylogenetic Tree for the Caminalcules 1. Obtain a large sheet of paper on which to construct a phylogenetic tree for the caminalcules. 2. Use a meter stick to draw 20 equally spaced horizontal lines on the paper. • Use each line to indicate an interval of one million years. • Label each line so that the one at the bottom of the paper represents an age of 19 million years and the top line represents the present (0 years). 3. Download the caminalcules Handout and cut out all the caminalcules (including the living species). 4. Put them in piles according to their age (the number in parentheses indicates age in millions of years). 5. Beginning with the oldest fossils, arrange the caminalcules on the tree according to their evolutionary relationship. Remember, the oldest forms are at the bottom of the tree. Hints, Suggestions and Warnings a. Use a pencil to faintly draw lines indicating the path of evolution. Only after you are sure of the correctness of your tree should you glue the figures in place and darken the lines. b. Branching should involve only two lines at a time: Like this Not this c. Some living forms are also found in the fossil record. d. There are gaps in the fossil record for some lineages. Also, some species went extinct without leaving any descendants. e. The caminalcules numbering is random; the numbers provide no clues to evolutionary relationships. f. There is only one correct phylogenetic tree in this exercise. This is because of the way that Joseph Camin derived his imaginary animals. He started with the most primitive form (#73) and gradually modified it using a process that mimics evolution in real organisms. After you complete your phylogeny, compare it with Camin’s original found in the course content. Part 3: Problems 1. You will notice that some lineages (e.g. the descendants of species 56) branched many times and are represented by many living species. What type of ecological conditions would result in the rapid diversification of some lineages? (A real world example would be the diversification of the mammals at the beginning of the Cenozoic, right after the dinosaurs went extinct.) 2. Some lineages (e.g. the descendants of species 58) changed very little over time. A good example of this would be “living fossils” like the horseshoe crab or cockroach. What is an example of an ecological condition that might cause this to happen? 3. Some caminalcules went extinct without leaving descendants. In the real world, what factors might increase or decrease the probability of a species going extinct? 4. Find one example of convergent evolution among the caminalcules. This means finding cases where two or more species have a similar characteristic that evolved independently in each lineage. The wings of bats, birds and bees are an example of convergence since the three groups did not inherit the characteristic from their common ancestor. Write your answers in complete sentences (e.g. “Species x and y both have ____ but their most recent common ancestor, z, did not”). 5. Describe one example of vestigial structures that you can find among the caminalcules. These are structures that have been reduced to the point that they are virtually useless. Ear muscles and the tailbones are examples of vestigial structures in our own species. 6. Explain how vestigial structures provide clues about a species’ evolutionary past. Illustrate your argument with vestigial structures found in humans or other real species.

 

Evolution

There are three parts to this lab. In part one, you will explore a fossil site, sketch a fossil, and write a short paragraph about the fossil and one of the fossil sites you visited. In part two, you will create a phylogenic tree, print and cut out all the caminalcules (you don’t have to be precise, and should leave the numbers attached), and glue the caminalcules to the tree following the instructions provided. In part three, use the tree to answer the six problems at the end of this document.

Part 1: Fossil Record

  1. Write a short paragraph about one of the sites you “visited”.

I visited National Geographic and looked through lots of pictures and facts about fossils. There are so many different types of fossils, coming in all different shapes and sizes. There would be a picture of a fossil with a paragraph next to it sharing information about the fossil. The website was very informative and helpful.

 

 

 

 

  1. Make a sketch of your favorite fossil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Write a one-paragraph description to accompany your sketch.

I sketched an example of a Stromatolite fossil. These types of fossils are the oldest fossils found at the Grand Canyon. I found this fossil to be very pretty and unique, and that’s why I chose it to be the fossil I sketched.

 

 

 

 

Part 2: Caminalcules as a Model of the Fossil Record

First, read about the Caminalcules, which were imaginary animals invented by the late University of Kansas evolutionary biologist Joseph Camin. Then create the phylogenic tree for Caminalcules.

Caminalcules as a Model of the Fossil Record

Caminalcules were imaginary animals invented by the late University of Kansas evolutionary biologist, Joseph Camin. They make ideal model organisms for introducing students to evolution. In this lab, you will construct an evolutionary history of the caminalcules using fossil species. In the process of doing this exercise, you are introduced to concepts, such as convergent evolution and vestigial structures.

As a consequence of Darwin’s work, taxonomic classifications must be actual reflections of the evolutionary history of the group being studied. For example, Linnaeus put humans and wolves in the class Mammalia, within the phylum Chordata, because they share certain characteristics (e.g., backbone, hair, etc.). We now interpret this similarity as reflecting the shared evolutionary history of both species through their descent from a common ancestor.  Generally speaking, the more resemblance between two species, the more recently they diverged from their common ancestor. Thus, when we say that the human and wolf are more closely related to each other than either is to the honeybee, we mean that they share a common ancestor that is not shared with the honeybee.

Another way of showing the evolutionary relationship between organisms is in the form of a phylogenetic tree (Gk. phylon, stock, tribe + genus, birth, origin):

The vertical axis in this figure is the timeline, typically shown over millions of years. The separation of two lines indicates when that lineage split from each other, despite their common ancestor. For example, the diagram shows us that mammals diverged from reptiles about 150 million years ago. The most recent common ancestor shared by mammals and reptiles is indicated by point A in the diagram. The horizontal axis represents, in a general way, the amount of divergence that has occurred between different groups; the greater the distance, the more divergence has happened and the further back in time is the common ancestor. Since they share a fairly recent ancestor, species within the same group (such as the class Mammalia) tend to be closer to each other at the top of the tree than they are to members of other groups.

Several types of evidence can elucidate the evolutionary relationship between organisms. One approach is to compare living species. The greater the differences between them, the longer ago they presumably diverged. There are, however, pitfalls with this approach. Occasionally, species resemble each other because they independently evolved similar structures in response to similar environments or ways of life, not because of a recent common ancestor. This is called convergent evolution; distantly related species seem to have converged on a common set of adaptations. Examples of convergent evolution include the wings of bats, birds, and insects, or the streamlined shape of dolphins and fish. At first glance, it might appear that dolphins are fish. However, further examination shows this resemblance is superficial, resulting from the fact that dolphins and fish have adapted to the same environment.  The presence of hair, the ability to lactate and homeothermy clearly demonstrate that dolphins are mammals. Fish lack these features.

The fossil record can also be helpful for constructing phylogenetic trees. For example, bears were once thought to be within the order Carnivora. Recently discovered fossils, however, show that they actually diverged from the Canidae (wolves, etc.) fairly recently. The use of fossils is not without its problems, however. The most notable, and perhaps greatest problem, is the incomplete nature of the fossil record. This is more of a problem for some organisms than others. For example, organisms with shells or bony skeletons are more likely to be preserved than those without hard body parts.

 

 

Construct a Phylogenetic Tree for the Caminalcules

  1. Obtain a large sheet of paper on which to construct a phylogenetic tree for the caminalcules.
  2. Use a meter stick to draw 20 equally spaced horizontal lines on the paper.
  • Use each line to indicate an interval of one million years.
  • Label each line so that the one at the bottom of the paper represents an age of 19 million years and the top line represents the present (0 years).
  1. Download the caminalcules Handout and cut out all the caminalcules (including the living species).
  2. Put them in piles according to their age (the number in parentheses indicates age in millions of years).
  3. Beginning with the oldest fossils, arrange the caminalcules on the tree according to their evolutionary relationship. Remember, the oldest forms are at the bottom of the tree.

Hints, Suggestions and Warnings

  1. Use a pencil to faintly draw lines indicating the path of evolution. Only after you are sure of the correctness of your tree should you glue the figures in place and darken the lines.
  2. Branching should involve only two lines at a time:
Like this           Not this
  1. Some living forms are also found in the fossil record.
  2. There are gaps in the fossil record for some lineages. Also, some species went extinct without leaving any descendants.
  3. The caminalcules numbering is random; the numbers provide no clues to evolutionary relationships.
  4. There is only one correct phylogenetic tree in this exercise. This is because of the way that Joseph Camin derived his imaginary animals. He started with the most primitive form (#73) and gradually modified it using a process that mimics evolution in real organisms. After you complete your phylogeny, compare it with Camin’s original found in the course content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 3: Problems 

  1. You will notice that some lineages (e.g. the descendants of species 56) branched many times and are represented by many living species. What type of ecological conditions would result in the rapid diversification of some lineages? (A real world example would be the diversification of the mammals at the beginning of the Cenozoic, right after the dinosaurs went extinct.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Some lineages (e.g. the descendants of species 58) changed very little over time.  A good example of this would be “living fossils” like the horseshoe crab or cockroach. What is an example of an ecological condition that might cause this to happen?

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Some caminalcules went extinct without leaving descendants. In the real world, what factors might increase or decrease the probability of a species going extinct?

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Find one example of convergent evolution among the caminalcules.  This means finding cases where two or more species have a similar characteristic that evolved independently in each lineage.  The wings of bats, birds and bees are an example of convergence since the three groups did not inherit the characteristic from their common ancestor.  Write your answers in complete sentences (e.g. “Species x and y both have ____ but their most recent common ancestor, z, did not”).

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Describe one example of vestigial structures that you can find among the caminalcules. These are structures that have been reduced to the point that they are virtually useless.  Ear muscles and the tailbones are examples of vestigial structures in our own species.

 

 

 

  1. Explain how vestigial structures provide clues about a species’ evolutionary past.  Illustrate your argument with vestigial structures found in humans or other real species.

 

 

 

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See attached file. Has the same information with clickable links. I want 600 words for each question. so does the professor. i can’t upload the other file. Weathering, Sedimentary Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks, Geologic Time, Deformation, Earthquakes (Chapters 6 through 11) The subject is Earthquakes. 1. LOCALLY… First we’ll consider the types of faulting we have in southern and central California (up to Cape Mendocino). They’re called strike-slip faults, and are found where one block of crust is sliding horizontally past another. The most famous of these is the San Andreas Fault (SAF), which runs from the corner of the Salton Sea 700 miles north-by-northwest to Cape Mendocino, The earthquakes produced by this fault can be large as 8.0+ which is rather impressive, but pale in comparison to truly “great” earthquakes like the 2011 Japan (Tohoku) earthquake and tsunami. So for the first part of this assignment, let’s take a look at our local ‘cousin’ of the SAF, the Rose Canyon Fault (RCF). Study the following resources: • The web page “Significant Earthquakes and Faults” at http://scedc.caltech.edu/significant/ – note the various faults in our neighborhood, and how often each has produced earthquakes. • The video “The Rise and Fall of San Diego” which I have posted in YouTube, with Closed Captioning (cc), at http://youtu.be/-drjJoRGfAk – thanks, Dr. Pat Abbott! • Another Pat Abbott video “Earthquake Country Los Angeles” (note that the Newport-Inglewood Fault he talks about continues south from Newport Beach underwater, until it emerges as the Rose Canyon Fault at LaJolla and continues through Old Town, Downtown San Diego and across the bay past Coronado. It’s on my YouTube Channel (cc) at http://youtu.be/axLLD80Aa9I, again with closed captions. • The web page “Recent Earthquakes in California and Nevada” at http://scedc.caltech.edu/recent/ – note the number at the lower left of the map (758, as I write this). That is the total number of temblors detected by seismometers in the last week. Most are too feeble to be felt, fortunately! • From Scripps Institution of Oceanography comes a very recent (7 March 2017) study of the Newport- Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault which suggests that an earthquake with a magnitude of up to M7.4 could happen. The link to the actual SIO study is http://news.agu.org/press-release/fault-system-off-san-diego-orange-los- angeles-counties-produce-magnitude-7-3-quake/ – if you’d like an abbreviated version, do a Google search. QUESTION #1: I want you to think about earthquake preparation. You have probably been bombarded with information from all sorts of government entities a. Which scenario should someone in San Diego be more concerned about, a magnitude 8.1 on the stretch of the San Andreas Fault from the Salton Sea to San Bernardino, Wrightwood and Palmdale, or a magnitude 7.1 on the offshore portion of the Rose Canyon / Newport-Inglewood Fault (Dana Point to LaJolla)? Explain your answer. b. What steps should you take to lessen the effects of an earthquake to you and your loved ones? Remember, you will be responsible for taking care of yourself for three days with no power, no cell service and streets impassible. Think about your furniture, your food and water supplies, medications, etc. c. Just for fun, think about the worst place(s) to be when a big earthquake strikes. (I know that after the Northridge quake in 1994, I neither wanted to be on top of an overpass, nor stopped under one!) Your answer should be no less than 600 words. (25 points) MLA format essay type. Page 2 of 2 Geology 100, Phil Farquharson, presiding Second Writing Assignment Spring 2017 Weathering, Sedimentary Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks, Geologic Time, Deformation, Earthquakes (Chapters 6 through 11) 2. GLOBALLY… Let’s take a look at how many earthquakes occur in the world every hour of every day. Even discounting the tiny shakers that most people can’t feel (less than about 2.5 or so), the number is staggering – for the year 2011, there were more than 9,000 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4.5 or greater, which is quiet impressive when put into an animation like the one shown in the animation in Blackboard entitled “2011 World earthquakes Visualization map” (web link is https://youtu.be/h4SULuWS9eQ) – note the pattern of the yellow dots (epicenters) left behind. Doesn’t it look a lot like the figure in your book showing earthquake concentrations? But note that the really big quakes are only at convergent plate boundaries, especially where subduction is involved. The biggest earthquake ever recorded happened in 1960, off the coast of Chile. It was a magnitude 9.5, and created an ocean-crossing, devastating tsunami. All of the really big tsunami-creating earthquakes have been on the so-called Ring of Fire, plus one off the northwest edge of Sumatra. I’ve already mentioned the San Andreas Fault, which is NOT capable of generating tsunami (in spite of the really bad 2015 Hollywood movie “San Andreas” (starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson)). But where the San Andreas ends, at Cape Mendocino the Cascadia Fault begins. It stretches from just south of Eureka, California more than 700 miles to the north end of Vancouver Island, California, and generated a M9.0 earthquake on January 26th, 1700, with a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean and washed on shore in Japan. Study the following resources: • The previously-mentioned video entitled “2011 World earthquakes Visualization map” (web link is https://youtu.be/h4SULuWS9eQ) It appears that the total amount of energy released by earthquakes on a year- by-year basis is relatively steady. • A video entitled “Tsunamis Generated by Megathrust Earthquakes” at https://youtu.be/VJIdMvL9KcA – a ‘megathrust’ fault is the kind found at a subduction margin. In this animation we explore different tsunami- producing mechanisms by examining three famous earthquakes: Japan 2011, Chile 2010, and Alaska 1964 (text on YouTube says 2014, but no…). • Another video, “Tectonic Earthquakes of the Pacific Northwest” at https://youtu.be/_belQwGNolY, shows the different types of earthquakes that can be expected in the Pacific Northwest. • Brian Atwater gave a talk at a U.S. Geological Survey in 2015 about the solving of a mystery that had been vexing Japanese scientists since 1700 AD. The talk was entitled “Cascadia Earthquake of January 26, 1700 – Detective Stories from North America and Japan” and can be found at https://youtu.be/AiojgMBQPBM – the study is an Open-File Report, and can be downloaded from http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/pp1707/. It’s another case that shows how the Scientific Method in action. • Check out the San Diego County Office of Emergency Services “Tsunami Facts and Preparedness” web page at http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/oes/disaster_preparedness/oes_jl_tsunami.html -check out the brochures and inundation maps to see how you might be affected. Question #2: I live in Point Loma, at an altitude of 17 feet above sea level, 240 meters from Point Loma Sportfishing. Should I be concerned about preparations in the event of a tsunami generated by an earthquake off the coast of Chile (like the one in 2010)? The answer is, yes I am ‘concerned’ although in 2010 the tsunami did considerable damage in both San Diego Bay and Mission Bay, but did not rise up over the sidewalk. My questions to you, though: a. What is the altitude above sea level at you residence? Where you work? Along your customary route of travel? Have you considered those ‘Tsunami Evacuation Route’ signs you may have seen along the coast? b. Please explain the different ways a great earthquake like Tohoku 2011, Alaska 1964 or Cascadia 1700 can generate an ocean-crossing tsunami. Your answer should be no less than 600 words. (25 points)

See attached file. Has the same information with clickable links. I want 600 words for each question. so does the professor. i can’t upload the other file.

Weathering, Sedimentary Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks, Geologic Time, Deformation, Earthquakes (Chapters 6 through 11) The subject is Earthquakes.

1. LOCALLY… First we’ll consider the types of faulting we have in southern and central California (up to Cape Mendocino). They’re called strike-slip faults, and are found where one block of crust is sliding horizontally past another. The most famous of these is the San Andreas Fault (SAF), which runs from the corner of the Salton Sea 700 miles north-by-northwest to Cape Mendocino, The earthquakes produced by this fault can be large as 8.0+ which is rather impressive, but pale in comparison to truly “great” earthquakes like the 2011 Japan (Tohoku) earthquake and tsunami.

So for the first part of this assignment, let’s take a look at our local ‘cousin’ of the SAF, the Rose Canyon Fault (RCF).

Study the following resources: • The web page “Significant Earthquakes and Faults” at http://scedc.caltech.edu/significant/ – note the various faults in our neighborhood, and how often each has produced earthquakes. • The video “The Rise and Fall of San Diego” which I have posted in YouTube, with Closed Captioning (cc), at http://youtu.be/-drjJoRGfAk – thanks, Dr. Pat Abbott! • Another Pat Abbott video “Earthquake Country Los Angeles” (note that the Newport-Inglewood Fault he talks about continues south from Newport Beach underwater, until it emerges as the Rose Canyon Fault at LaJolla and continues through Old Town, Downtown San Diego and across the bay past Coronado. It’s on my YouTube Channel (cc) at http://youtu.be/axLLD80Aa9I, again with closed captions. • The web page “Recent Earthquakes in California and Nevada” at http://scedc.caltech.edu/recent/ – note the number at the lower left of the map (758, as I write this). That is the total number of temblors detected by seismometers in the last week. Most are too feeble to be felt, fortunately! • From Scripps Institution of Oceanography comes a very recent (7 March 2017) study of the Newport- Inglewood/Rose Canyon Fault which suggests that an earthquake with a magnitude of up to M7.4 could happen. The link to the actual SIO study is http://news.agu.org/press-release/fault-system-off-san-diego-orange-los- angeles-counties-produce-magnitude-7-3-quake/ – if you’d like an abbreviated version, do a Google search.

QUESTION #1: I want you to think about earthquake preparation. You have probably been bombarded with information from all sorts of government entities a. Which scenario should someone in San Diego be more concerned about, a magnitude 8.1 on the stretch of the San Andreas Fault from the Salton Sea to San Bernardino, Wrightwood and Palmdale, or a magnitude 7.1 on the offshore portion of the Rose Canyon / Newport-Inglewood Fault (Dana Point to LaJolla)? Explain your answer. b. What steps should you take to lessen the effects of an earthquake to you and your loved ones? Remember, you will be responsible for taking care of yourself for three days with no power, no cell service and streets impassible. Think about your furniture, your food and water supplies, medications, etc. c. Just for fun, think about the worst place(s) to be when a big earthquake strikes. (I know that after the Northridge quake in 1994, I neither wanted to be on top of an overpass, nor stopped under one!) Your answer should be no less than 600 words. (25 points) MLA format essay type.

Page 2 of 2 Geology 100, Phil Farquharson, presiding Second Writing Assignment Spring 2017 Weathering, Sedimentary Rocks, Metamorphic Rocks, Geologic Time, Deformation, Earthquakes (Chapters 6 through 11)

2. GLOBALLY… Let’s take a look at how many earthquakes occur in the world every hour of every day. Even discounting the tiny shakers that most people can’t feel (less than about 2.5 or so), the number is staggering – for the year 2011, there were more than 9,000 earthquakes with a magnitude of 4.5 or greater, which is quiet impressive when put into an animation like the one shown in the animation in Blackboard entitled “2011 World earthquakes Visualization map” (web link is https://youtu.be/h4SULuWS9eQ) – note the pattern of the yellow dots (epicenters) left behind. Doesn’t it look a lot like the figure in your book showing earthquake concentrations? But note that the really big quakes are only at convergent plate boundaries, especially where subduction is involved. The biggest earthquake ever recorded happened in 1960, off the coast of Chile. It was a magnitude 9.5, and created an ocean-crossing, devastating tsunami. All of the really big tsunami-creating earthquakes have been on the so-called Ring of Fire, plus one off the northwest edge of Sumatra. I’ve already mentioned the San Andreas Fault, which is NOT capable of generating tsunami (in spite of the really bad 2015 Hollywood movie “San Andreas” (starring Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson)). But where the San Andreas ends, at Cape Mendocino the Cascadia Fault begins. It stretches from just south of Eureka, California more than 700 miles to the north end of Vancouver Island, California, and generated a M9.0 earthquake on January 26th, 1700, with a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean and washed on shore in Japan.

Study the following resources:

• The previously-mentioned video entitled “2011 World earthquakes Visualization map” (web link is https://youtu.be/h4SULuWS9eQ) It appears that the total amount of energy released by earthquakes on a year- by-year basis is relatively steady. • A video entitled “Tsunamis Generated by Megathrust Earthquakes” at https://youtu.be/VJIdMvL9KcA – a ‘megathrust’ fault is the kind found at a subduction margin. In this animation we explore different tsunami- producing mechanisms by examining three famous earthquakes: Japan 2011, Chile 2010, and Alaska 1964 (text on YouTube says 2014, but no…). • Another video, “Tectonic Earthquakes of the Pacific Northwest” at https://youtu.be/_belQwGNolY, shows the different types of earthquakes that can be expected in the Pacific Northwest. • Brian Atwater gave a talk at a U.S. Geological Survey in 2015 about the solving of a mystery that had been vexing Japanese scientists since 1700 AD. The talk was entitled “Cascadia Earthquake of January 26, 1700 – Detective Stories from North America and Japan” and can be found at https://youtu.be/AiojgMBQPBM – the study is an Open-File Report, and can be downloaded from http://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/pp1707/. It’s another case that shows how the Scientific Method in action. • Check out the San Diego County Office of Emergency Services “Tsunami Facts and Preparedness” web page at http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/oes/disaster_preparedness/oes_jl_tsunami.html -check out the brochures and inundation maps to see how you might be affected.

Question #2: I live in Point Loma, at an altitude of 17 feet above sea level, 240 meters from Point Loma Sportfishing. Should I be concerned about preparations in the event of a tsunami generated by an earthquake off the coast of Chile (like the one in 2010)? The answer is, yes I am ‘concerned’ although in 2010 the tsunami did considerable damage in both San Diego Bay and Mission Bay, but did not rise up over the sidewalk. My questions to you, though: a. What is the altitude above sea level at you residence? Where you work? Along your customary route of travel? Have you considered those ‘Tsunami Evacuation Route’ signs you may have seen along the coast? b. Please explain the different ways a great earthquake like Tohoku 2011, Alaska 1964 or Cascadia 1700 can generate an ocean-crossing tsunami. Your answer should be no less than 600 words. (25 points)

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