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TEACHING ASSIGNMENT 2 In Part 1, answer the questions related to the assigned reading material.In Part 2, you will continue to develop your Bible lesson(which you began/presented in Module/Week 1). Part 1: Answer the following questions related to the Reading & Study material from Modules/Weeks 1–3.Each answer must be at least 100 words to receive credit. 1. The following questions are based on Chapter 3 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. Explain the relationship between theology and Christian education. Theology must be at the center of Christian education. Because theology is the study of God, you cannot rightfully have a true Christian education without theology. Because God, through the Holy Spirit, inspired the writers of the Bible, this is why the Bible must also be central to Christian education. By learning the Bible and learning the message of God, we are combining theology and Christian education. By learning the Bible and also by studying God, we also are learning faith. We learn to trust in Him and to trust that Jesus was sent down to die for our sins. By using theology, we also learn that God is the ultimate teacher. He is the one who is central to giving us our Christian education. Word Count – 125 b. What methods does God use to teach today in comparison with the methods He used in both the Old and New Testaments? In the Old and New Testaments, God would reveal Himself and teach directly to His followers through His own words coming down from heaven. He spoke through visions and prophets. He sent His Son down to teach us and die for us. In comparison, today God’s primary teaching method is through those called to the ministry and through the Bible. Having His inspired word to read from, to base lessons off of, and to show us His power and glory is one of the most common methods He uses today. He has always used revelation to us as a teaching method, it is just less direct in modern times than it was in the Old and New Testaments. Word Count – 118 2. The following questions are based on Chapter 5 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. Why is the Holy Spirit essential in Christian teaching? The Holy Spirit is essential in Christian teaching because He is essential to all spiritual tasks. He helps Christian teachers understand the word, He motivates the students of the word, and He grants Spiritual Gifts to the teachers of the Word. The Holy Spirit is the one who inspired the writers of the Bible, and He continues to inspire the teachers of God’s word today. If teachers of God’s Word do not interact with the Holy Spirit and use the gifts that have been bestowed upon them, their teachings likely will fall short of reaching the goal of spreading God’s message. The Holy Spirit helps teachers spread the proper message and allows listeners to be open to receiving the message. Word Count – 120 b. In what ways can you partner with the Holy Spirit to help you teach? Some use “dependence on the Spirit” as an excuse for poor preparation. How would you explain that this attitude is a misconception of the Spirit’s role? If you depend on the Holy Spirit to fail to prepare yourself for teaching, then you are not fully using the gifts that were bestowed upon you. While we do need to use the Holy Spirit’s guidance for our lessons, we must also do some research and change our message based on the audience. You cannot deliver the same message to every audience and expect positive results every time. Some audiences need more interactive methods of hearing the Word, such as seeing it acted out in plays, while others are happy with listening to sermons as the only way to learn the Word. It is the teacher’s job to understand what methods to use and which to avoid. One thing I can do to partner with the Holy Spirit is to fully understand the Spiritual Gifts that have been bestowed upon me. By understanding my own strengths and weaknesses, I can better figure out how to use my own strengths to spread God’s Word and avoid my own weaknesses when trying to evangelize others. Word Count – 174 3. The following questions are based on Chapter 6 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. How do you judge something as biblical or not biblical? What do you think of the thought experiment suggested by the author of this chapter? (Respond as if the author of the book you are teaching is in your audience.) Something can be judged as biblical or not biblical with one very easy thought: does it accurately reflect the teaching of the original Bible verse that it is based off of? If it does, it is considered biblical. If you keep the same message as the original message, it is biblical. However, if you lose the message in translation or you change what the verse was intended to teach, then it is not biblical. I think the thought experiment proposed can be very helpful. If you would be happy to teach the message to the original writer of the scripture and know that they would agree that the message got through to the audience, then the message could be considered biblical. However, if the original author of the scripture would not agree that the intended meaning of the verse got through to the audience, it is not biblical. If the author thought their words were taken out of context, it would not pass the test and the message should be reevaluated. This can be used as a very good test to figure out if you are teaching your message properly. Word Count – 190 b. How did Jesus and Paul stay faithful to God’s message while presenting this message to different audiences? Jesus and Paul were faithful to God’s message because they made sure that their teachings were sound and grounded in the message of God. Now, this was obviously much easier for Jesus, but Paul also did it very well. By tweaking his message slightly after studying the culture to whom he would be teaching currently and using different styles of speech, Paul and Jesus were both able to have their words and messages have the most impact on those they were teaching to. They made sure to preach the truths of God and His graciousness and forgiveness. They understood that no two cultures would accept the Word in the same manner, so they made sure the core message remained the same while using words and imagery that each audience would understand. Word Count – 131 4. The following questions are based on Chapter 7 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. How does the personal spiritual walk of the pastor or other leaders influence the spiritual maturity of church members? The personal spiritual walk of church leaders can be used as examples for other church members and provide an example to them on how they can better serve the Lord. It is likely that every church leader has had some sort of spiritual crisis in their life. This does not mean, however, that they are any less Christian. It was just part of their journey to come closer to God. It also can make them seem like they are more of a “normal person” to those within their congregation. By showing their congregation that even the leaders struggle sometimes, this can give them faith that, even in times of struggle, God will be there for them also. Word Count – 117 b. Describe your image of a maturing Christian. I think Christians are always maturing in their faith. To say you are not maturing means that you are no longer growing in your faith. Christians who continue to learn and are open to learning more about God, about Jesus, about the Scriptures, these are Christians who will always grow and mature in their faith. Christians also continue to mature by continuing to learn new and possibly better methods to spread God’s Word and do the work required of the Great Commission. No matter if you found God at a very young age or you are new to coming to know Him, every Christian is called to learn, called to disciple others, and called to have faith that there is a life beyond this earthly one that we aspire to spend with God. Maturing Christians continue to pray to God, continue to learn about the Spiritual Gifts that have been bestowed upon them by the Holy Spirit, and continue to learn how they can use those gifts to glorify God. Word Count – 170 5. The following questions are based on Chapter 10 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. What is your reaction to the description of the pastor-teacher given in this chapter? How does Paul’s model of the pastor-teacher compare to “secular” models of leadership? My first reaction to the idea of the pastor-teacher is that it is right on target. Pastor-teachers should be expected to walk the walk if they are going to talk the talk. This is to say that if they are going to preach the Word of God and tell others to spread God’s Word to others, they should be living the Word and spreading it themselves, not just during church but at all times. Another positive about the description listed in the chapter is that the pastor-teacher cannot, and should not, do the work alone. Everyone is blessed with certain Spiritual Gifts, bestowed upon them by the Holy Spirit. We must work with others, letting them use their own Spiritual Gifts, to more effectively spread God’s Word to as many people as possible. We cannot, and should not expect to, do the work on our own. Even Jesus had 12 disciples to help spread His message. One of the biggest differences between Paul’s pastor-teacher example and the “secular” model of leadership is many times, leaders are expected to know it all and do more than they are capable of on their own. Many times they are also not expected to do the tough work that they expect of others. Instead of leading by example, they just delegate the work and let others take care of it for them. This is not nearly as effective as Paul’s pastor-teacher model. Word Count – 238 b. How would others describe your teaching? If you do not teach regularly, describe the teaching of one of your own pastor-teachers. Because I don’t do much teaching, I will use my old youth minister for my example in this question. He was an excellent pastor-teacher. While he would always ask if we understood the teachings and do his best to describe to us what they meant, we also got to experience him living out the teachings in his own life. He was very good at leading by example, not by just giving lessons and expecting us to abide by them while he lived however he wanted. He also used many other people within the church to help him. He would get someone who was personally touched by a verse or someone whose experience could relate to the lesson. He knew that he could not do all of the work of the Great Commission on his own, so he relied on God to send others to help him spread the message. Word Count – 149 6. The following questions are based on Chapter 11 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. Are you predominately a thinker, a feeler, or a doer? What evidence supports your evaluation? What dangers do you risk in focusing only on this “natural” emphasis? I would say I am more of a feeler than a doer or thinker. The reason I say this is because I always try to relate things to my own personal life or to someone else’s personal life. I sometimes keep things a little too lighthearted instead of focusing on the seriousness of the subject matter at hand. The risk of being purely a feeler is that the message can get lost in the personal realm. It makes it more difficult to make the message have a meaning outside of one’s own life and how they can take that message out and spread it to others. There should be a greater purpose to every lesson, not just a personal reason involved. Word Count – 121 b. As a teacher, where do you need more emphasis: helping people think, feel, or do? What specifically will you do to strengthen these areas? I think I need to put more emphasis on helping people do. As I stated above, many of my lessons can get too personal and only apply to the person listening without giving a way for them to apply the lesson to themselves as well as take it out to the world and spread the message. I can do this by showing behaviors that can be taught through the lesson and how to show those behaviors to others. I can try to motivate others to go out to the world and spread God’s love and message while still knowing how to apply the lesson to their own lives. Word Count – 108 7. The following questions are based on Chapter 12 in Yount’s Teaching Ministry of the Church: a. What is the connection between exegesis, hermeneutics, and teaching or exposition? The connection that exists between these terms is a strong one. Through exegesis, we work to determine the original meaning and context of the text of the Bible. Through hermeneutics, we attempt to explain or interpret the Bible. Through teaching or exposition, we seek to teach others the meaning of the verse and how they can apply it. Without knowing the original context of the verse through exegesis, there is no one to figure out how to teach the verse in a manner that will apply to the modern Christian. Everyone wants to know how they can apply the lessons they learn in the Bible to their own lives. It is sometimes difficult to find a way to bridge the original context to a present day context, but this is something that a skilled teacher will be able to do. They will be able to determine the original meaning, explain that meaning to those they are teaching to, and then teach how they can apply that lesson to their own lives. God did not have the Bible written to only explain lessons that were applicable to those in Biblical times. He wanted those lessons to stand the test of time. Word Count – 200 b. Describe the general rules of biblical interpretation. There are five general rules of biblical interpretation. The first one is rather self-explanatory. We must interpret the verse in the literal sense, looking at the original context in which it was written. The second rule is to interpret the verse or passage within the context of the book which it is written. We must look at the situation going on around the verse and the other possible lessons being taught and use that to help us with our interpretation of the meaning. The third rule is to look at the historical context within which the passage was written. This takes into account the culture and historical event going on at the time. Culture has a large effect on how the verse was original delivered. The fourth rule is to interpret the verse based on the type of book in which it was written. We must determine if the book is an epistle, a narrative, a book of poetry, a book of proverbs, if it is written within one of the parables, or if it is prophetic in nature. The fifth and final rule is to view it in terms of related verses or passages. Many passages in the Bible will parallel other verses of stories within the Bible. This also requires us to look at some books, especially in the Old Testament, in light of the fact that some of the prophecies may have already come to fruition. Only by following these five rules can a biblical scholar and teacher figure out how to apply the passage or verse to the modern day reader and student of the Bible. Word Count – 270   Part 2: The following questions/prompts will assist you in the development of the Bible lesson you began in Module/Week 1. Each answer must be at least 100 words to receive credit. 1. Using the information fromChapter 13 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church, write an objective and a learning readiness activity for the passage you chose for Teaching Assignment 1 in Module/Week 1. For example, if your basic objective is for students to “demonstrate understanding” of the passage you are teaching, then you will need to explain how they will do that. 2. Based on the discussion in Chapter 5 of Wilhoit & Ryken’s Effective Bible Teaching, what is the genre of your Bible passage, and how does this affect the way you understand and teach your passage? 3. Based on the discussion in Chapter 6 of Wilhoit & Ryken’s Effective Bible Teaching, answer the following questions: a. Discuss the topic and theme (“big idea”) of your Bible passage. Pay close attention to the discussion and examples in your textbook. b. Explain how each sentence of your Bible passage relates to the big idea you formulated above. 4. Based on the discussion in Chapter 7 of Wilhoit & Ryken’s Effective Bible Teaching, discuss how you will “bridge the gap” from the world of your biblical passage to the world of your audience. Refer to the section in the chapter titled “The Bible Teacher as Translator.” You may also refer to the Yount textbook.

Teaching Assignment 2

In Part 1, answer the questions related to the assigned reading material.In Part 2, you will continue to develop your Bible lesson(which you began/presented in Module/Week 1).

Part 1: Answer the following questions related to the Reading & Study material from Modules/Weeks 1–3.Each answer must be at least 100 words to receive credit.

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 3 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. Explain the relationship between theology and Christian education.

Theology must be at the center of Christian education. Because theology is the study of God, you cannot rightfully have a true Christian education without theology. Because God, through the Holy Spirit, inspired the writers of the Bible, this is why the Bible must also be central to Christian education. By learning the Bible and learning the message of God, we are combining theology and Christian education. By learning the Bible and also by studying God, we also are learning faith. We learn to trust in Him and to trust that Jesus was sent down to die for our sins.  By using theology, we also learn that God is the ultimate teacher. He is the one who is central to giving us our Christian education.

Word Count – 125

  1. What methods does God use to teach today in comparison with the methods He used in both the Old and New Testaments?

In the Old and New Testaments, God would reveal Himself and teach directly to His followers through His own words coming down from heaven. He spoke through visions and prophets. He sent His Son down to teach us and die for us. In comparison, today God’s primary teaching method is through those called to the ministry and through the Bible. Having His inspired word to read from, to base lessons off of, and to show us His power and glory is one of the most common methods He uses today. He has always used revelation to us as a teaching method, it is just less direct in modern times than it was in the Old and New Testaments.

Word Count – 118

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 5 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. Why is the Holy Spirit essential in Christian teaching?

The Holy Spirit is essential in Christian teaching because He is essential to all spiritual tasks. He helps Christian teachers understand the word, He motivates the students of the word, and He grants Spiritual Gifts to the teachers of the Word. The Holy Spirit is the one who inspired the writers of the Bible, and He continues to inspire the teachers of God’s word today. If teachers of God’s Word do not interact with the Holy Spirit and use the gifts that have been bestowed upon them, their teachings likely will fall short of reaching the goal of spreading God’s message. The Holy Spirit helps teachers spread the proper message and allows listeners to be open to receiving the message.

Word Count – 120

  1. In what ways can you partner with the Holy Spirit to help you teach? Some use “dependence on the Spirit” as an excuse for poor preparation. How would you explain that this attitude is a misconception of the Spirit’s role?

If you depend on the Holy Spirit to fail to prepare yourself for teaching, then you are not fully using the gifts that were bestowed upon you. While we do need to use the Holy Spirit’s guidance for our lessons, we must also do some research and change our message based on the audience. You cannot deliver the same message to every audience and expect positive results every time. Some audiences need more interactive methods of hearing the Word, such as seeing it acted out in plays, while others are happy with listening to sermons as the only way to learn the Word. It is the teacher’s job to understand what methods to use and which to avoid.

One thing I can do to partner with the Holy Spirit is to fully understand the Spiritual Gifts that have been bestowed upon me. By understanding my own strengths and weaknesses, I can better figure out how to use my own strengths to spread God’s Word and avoid my own weaknesses when trying to evangelize others.

Word Count – 174

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 6 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. How do you judge something as biblical or not biblical? What do you think of the thought experiment suggested by the author of this chapter? (Respond as if the author of the book you are teaching is in your audience.)

Something can be judged as biblical or not biblical with one very easy thought: does it accurately reflect the teaching of the original Bible verse that it is based off of? If it does, it is considered biblical. If you keep the same message as the original message, it is biblical. However, if you lose the message in translation or you change what the verse was intended to teach, then it is not biblical.

I think the thought experiment proposed can be very helpful. If you would be happy to teach the message to the original writer of the scripture and know that they would agree that the message got through to the audience, then the message could be considered biblical. However, if the original author of the scripture would not agree that the intended meaning of the verse got through to the audience, it is not biblical. If the author thought their words were taken out of context, it would not pass the test and the message should be reevaluated. This can be used as a very good test to figure out if you are teaching your message properly.

Word Count – 190

  1. How did Jesus and Paul stay faithful to God’s message while presenting this message to different audiences?

Jesus and Paul were faithful to God’s message because they made sure that their teachings were sound and grounded in the message of God. Now, this was obviously much easier for Jesus, but Paul also did it very well. By tweaking his message slightly after studying the culture to whom he would be teaching currently and using different styles of speech, Paul and Jesus were both able to have their words and messages have the most impact on those they were teaching to. They made sure to preach the truths of God and His graciousness and forgiveness. They understood that no two cultures would accept the Word in the same manner, so they made sure the core message remained the same while using words and imagery that each audience would understand.

Word Count – 131

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 7 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. How does the personal spiritual walk of the pastor or other leaders influence the spiritual maturity of church members?

The personal spiritual walk of church leaders can be used as examples for other church members and provide an example to them on how they can better serve the Lord. It is likely that every church leader has had some sort of spiritual crisis in their life. This does not mean, however, that they are any less Christian. It was just part of their journey to come closer to God. It also can make them seem like they are more of a “normal person” to those within their congregation. By showing their congregation that even the leaders struggle sometimes, this can give them faith that, even in times of struggle, God will be there for them also.

Word Count – 117

  1. Describe your image of a maturing Christian.

I think Christians are always maturing in their faith. To say you are not maturing means that you are no longer growing in your faith. Christians who continue to learn and are open to learning more about God, about Jesus, about the Scriptures, these are Christians who will always grow and mature in their faith. Christians also continue to mature by continuing to learn new and possibly better methods to spread God’s Word and do the work required of the Great Commission. No matter if you found God at a very young age or you are new to coming to know Him, every Christian is called to learn, called to disciple others, and called to have faith that there is a life beyond this earthly one that we aspire to spend with God. Maturing Christians continue to pray to God, continue to learn about the Spiritual Gifts that have been bestowed upon them by the Holy Spirit, and continue to learn how they can use those gifts to glorify God.

Word Count – 170

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 10 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. What is your reaction to the description of the pastor-teacher given in this chapter? How does Paul’s model of the pastor-teacher compare to “secular” models of leadership?

My first reaction to the idea of the pastor-teacher is that it is right on target. Pastor-teachers should be expected to walk the walk if they are going to talk the talk. This is to say that if they are going to preach the Word of God and tell others to spread God’s Word to others, they should be living the Word and spreading it themselves, not just during church but at all times. Another positive about the description listed in the chapter is that the pastor-teacher cannot, and should not, do the work alone. Everyone is blessed with certain Spiritual Gifts, bestowed upon them by the Holy Spirit. We must work with others, letting them use their own Spiritual Gifts, to more effectively spread God’s Word to as many people as possible. We cannot, and should not expect to, do the work on our own. Even Jesus had 12 disciples to help spread His message.

One of the biggest differences between Paul’s pastor-teacher example and the “secular” model of leadership is many times, leaders are expected to know it all and do more than they are capable of on their own. Many times they are also not expected to do the tough work that they expect of others. Instead of leading by example, they just delegate the work and let others take care of it for them. This is not nearly as effective as Paul’s pastor-teacher model.

Word Count – 238

  1. How would others describe your teaching? If you do not teach regularly, describe the teaching of one of your own pastor-teachers.

Because I don’t do much teaching, I will use my old youth minister for my example in this question. He was an excellent pastor-teacher. While he would always ask if we understood the teachings and do his best to describe to us what they meant, we also got to experience him living out the teachings in his own life. He was very good at leading by example, not by just giving lessons and expecting us to abide by them while he lived however he wanted. He also used many other people within the church to help him. He would get someone who was personally touched by a verse or someone whose experience could relate to the lesson. He knew that he could not do all of the work of the Great Commission on his own, so he relied on God to send others to help him spread the message.

Word Count – 149

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 11 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. Are you predominately a thinker, a feeler, or a doer? What evidence supports your evaluation? What dangers do you risk in focusing only on this “natural” emphasis?

I would say I am more of a feeler than a doer or thinker. The reason I say this is because I always try to relate things to my own personal life or to someone else’s personal life. I sometimes keep things a little too lighthearted instead of focusing on the seriousness of the subject matter at hand. The risk of being purely a feeler is that the message can get lost in the personal realm. It makes it more difficult to make the message have a meaning outside of one’s own life and how they can take that message out and spread it to others. There should be a greater purpose to every lesson, not just a personal reason involved.

Word Count – 121

  1. As a teacher, where do you need more emphasis: helping people think, feel, or do? What specifically will you do to strengthen these areas?

I think I need to put more emphasis on helping people do. As I stated above, many of my lessons can get too personal and only apply to the person listening without giving a way for them to apply the lesson to themselves as well as take it out to the world and spread the message. I can do this by showing behaviors that can be taught through the lesson and how to show those behaviors to others. I can try to motivate others to go out to the world and spread God’s love and message while still knowing how to apply the lesson to their own lives.

Word Count – 108

  1. The following questions are based on Chapter 12 in Yount’s Teaching Ministry of the Church:
    1. What is the connection between exegesis, hermeneutics, and teaching or exposition?

The connection that exists between these terms is a strong one. Through exegesis, we work to determine the original meaning and context of the text of the Bible. Through hermeneutics, we attempt to explain or interpret the Bible. Through teaching or exposition, we seek to teach others the meaning of the verse and how they can apply it. Without knowing the original context of the verse through exegesis, there is no one to figure out how to teach the verse in a manner that will apply to the modern Christian. Everyone wants to know how they can apply the lessons they learn in the Bible to their own lives. It is sometimes difficult to find a way to bridge the original context to a present day context, but this is something that a skilled teacher will be able to do. They will be able to determine the original meaning, explain that meaning to those they are teaching to, and then teach how they can apply that lesson to their own lives. God did not have the Bible written to only explain lessons that were applicable to those in Biblical times. He wanted those lessons to stand the test of time.

Word Count – 200

  1. Describe the general rules of biblical interpretation.

There are five general rules of biblical interpretation. The first one is rather self-explanatory. We must interpret the verse in the literal sense, looking at the original context in which it was written. The second rule is to interpret the verse or passage within the context of the book which it is written. We must look at the situation going on around the verse and the other possible lessons being taught and use that to help us with our interpretation of the meaning. The third rule is to look at the historical context within which the passage was written. This takes into account the culture and historical event going on at the time. Culture has a large effect on how the verse was original delivered. The fourth rule is to interpret the verse based on the type of book in which it was written. We must determine if the book is an epistle, a narrative, a book of poetry, a book of proverbs, if it is written within one of the parables, or if it is prophetic in nature. The fifth and final rule is to view it in terms of related verses or passages. Many passages in the Bible will parallel other verses of stories within the Bible. This also requires us to look at some books, especially in the Old Testament, in light of the fact that some of the prophecies may have already come to fruition. Only by following these five rules can a biblical scholar and teacher figure out how to apply the passage or verse to the modern day reader and student of the Bible.

Word Count – 270


 

Part 2: The following questions/prompts will assist you in the development of the Bible lesson you began in Module/Week 1. Each answer must be at least 100 words to receive credit.

  1. Using the information fromChapter 13 in Yount’s The Teaching Ministry of the Church, write an objective and a learning readiness activity for the passage you chose for Teaching Assignment 1 in Module/Week 1.

For example, if your basic objective is for students to “demonstrate understanding” of the passage you are teaching, then you will need to explain how they will do that.

Objective:[e.g.,Demonstrate an understanding of (Scripture passage) by…(Explain how the student will demonstrate understanding of the passage as a result of your lesson.)]

 

Learning Readiness Activity:

 

 

 

 

  1. Based on the discussion in Chapter 5 of Wilhoit & Ryken’s Effective Bible Teaching, what is the genre of your Bible passage, and how does this affect the way you understand and teach your passage?

 

  1. Based on the discussion in Chapter 6 of Wilhoit & Ryken’s Effective Bible Teaching, answer the following questions:

 

  1. Discuss the topic and theme (“big idea”) of your Bible passage. Pay close attention to the discussion and examples in your textbook.

 

  1. Explain how each sentence of your Bible passage relates to the big idea you formulated above.

 

  1. Based on the discussion in Chapter 7 of Wilhoit & Ryken’s Effective Bible Teaching, discuss how you will “bridge the gap” from the world of your biblical passage to the world of your audience. Refer to the section in the chapter titled “The Bible Teacher as Translator.” You may also refer to the Yount textbook.

 

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